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of the working man's life. >> they seem to be doing that in some states. >> not allowing union bosses to compel them to write checks from their paychecks. where they don't belong. >> front page of all the papers. controversial right-to-work measures will soon be the law of the land in michigan. republican governor rick snider signed the law despite wide protests at the capitol. the law will make it illegal for a union employee to pay union dues as a condition of their employment. >> let's explain that. just for half a second. then we'll go on. right to work, what does it mean? people ask me, what does it mean? it means unions can force somebody to pay them if they want to get a job in the state of michigan. >> well, what it means is, if you get a job, the union extracts money from your paycheck for the dues for union dues. >> well, yeah. >> automatically. >> automatically. >> you've got no choice. oh, you want to work here? well, you've got to pay us. >> right. >> what if i don't want to pay you? what if i don't want to support the candidates you support? what if they're the antithesis of my va
start picking a fight with michigan union workers. [ music ] >> this is a fight for the survival of labor unions and the american middle class they support. just minutes ago, the michigan house of representatives passed the so-called "right to work bill." it passed 58 to 52. six republicans voted know, but the bill passed. and believe me if they can do this in michigan they can do it anywhere in the country. it gives new meaning to the term "lame-duck session." the bill basically eviscerates bargaining. it's a move to cut off the resources that give labor unions their strength. in addition to people funding, we have seen this work before. there is no doubt what's going on here. it is a war on unions. it is a war on the democratic party. today, a lansing state journal photographer captured this video as waves of union sportupporters and police flooded the state capitol trying to stop the bill. the capitol was locked down. police say they arrested eight people inside, and even used a chemical spray to regain control control. outside, union supporters mar
in the back. this is a state of course that was built by labor unions, has one of the highest percentages of union membership anywhere in the country. a state known for its union support and a state that really has been -- saves by labor unions particularly the autoworkers agreeing to significant cutbacks and benefits and salaries and everything to keep the auto industry afloat. as part of the auto bailout. of course, this is just the latest in this war on unions that we've seen. it started with scott walker in wisconsin. went on to ohio. and john kasich, we've seen a lot of it out of florida. we've seen a lot of it with rick scott. we've seen a lot of it of course in new jersey with chris christie. particularly in the midwest there's been this blatant war on unions. the latest is rick schneider, a guy who was just recently elected who says the last thing he wanted oh, no, no, no, he said this publicly, privately we heard this yesterday from steve cook, head of the michigan education association was a guest
, angry, united. bracing for protests in michigan as the state is poised to become the most unionized right to work state. as many as 10,000 unionized workers expected at the state capitol to voice their disapproval of the measure. some of them teachers, two detroit area school districts shut down for the day as hundreds of teachers plan to join the protest. president obama brought it up during a trip to a daimler truck factory in redford, michigan. this is what he said. >> this so-called right to work law, they don't have to do with economics, everything to do with politics. what they are really talking about is giving you the right to work for less money. >> alison kosik. >> what's the latest on the protests? >> protestsers starting to gather behind me. signs in hand, even the inflatable, a common theme when you see unions protest, the rats. thousands are hoping their voices will be heard. final votes taken on legislation, that right to work legislation, if it's passed would mean that workers would not be required to pay union dues. wouldn't be required to join a union which would b
were instrumental in reviving the auto industry and to see how unions have helped to build not just a straw upper-middle-class but a stronger america -- stronger middle-class but a stronger america. people and should be focused on the same pink. they should be working to make sure companies like this manufacturer is able to make more great products. that's what they should be focused on. host: distorts free press, courtesy of the newseum in washington, as this headline -- some schools are closed in the state so teachers can also protests that block today. here is the detroit news. there headline -- michigan pro-union people are protesting this law. the republican-led legislature is expected to take it up today. this legislation would bar workers from being required to pay union fees as a condition of employment even as thousands of union members plan to protest at the state capital. the story continues inside the new york times. we are getting your take on this this morning. start dialing in now. the wall street journal editorial page, they weigh in on the issue this morning. you ca
in the house, one passed as you said, 51-48. that is the public union portion of the right-to-work law. that passed the house. now with the house is going to do is vote on a senate bill on private unions and that is also expected to pass. once that does if it does, it's expected that measure will head to governor rick snider's desk where he is expected to sign it. i did talk to protesters here, i let them know that the first part did pass. one teacher i talked with who came out today said they're not listening to us standing out here. at the same time another person in favor of the measure came up to me and said, what's the latest? i said the first measure passed and she jumped up and said, yeah. you are feeling the tension start to happen here. one thing that happened 40 minutes ago a tent i don't know if you can see it there, a tent, that tent was actually for a group in favor of the right-to-work measure and one point, the unions tore it down. union members tore it down, presumably out of -- out of the tents -- the anger and the tense feeling that they are feeling here today in fron
with the detail. >> reporter: michigan is the birthplace of the united auto workers, but the future of unions in this state is in question at this hour, the fate over labor unions in michigan is vocal and visual. thousands of protesters stormed the state capitol. the measures were introduced and passed in a single day. rushed through democrats, argue, calling it a subversion of the ledge layive process. >> it terrifies me that they're trying to pass this through so quickly with no discussion from the other side, no understanding of what's important in it. >> the measures would make it illegal for unions and employers to mandate employees join a union or pay any money to the union. i spoke to michigan's republican governor rick schneider. >> i don't view it as anti-union at all. >> they tell me it's anti-worker, saying it gives workers less of a voice. what do you say to that? >> that's backward. this is about being pro worker. again, giving workers the choice, the freedom to choose, that's fundamental. >> so his legislation is anti-worker. it's going to end up being a devastating blow to the
, collapse of the soviet union, the chief lifeline for so many. you see the expansion of the democracy itself. and so from the period of 1974 to about 2005 was a moment of tremendous democratic growth. but then i say 2005 because since 2005, we've seen a decline in political pluralism around the world. six consecutive years that has but i wanted to do this book was examined by that wise. unless you find is that these regimes understand that in a more globally interconnected world that the past forms of coercion can no longer be the blood tools that were so familiar from the 20th century. but think of mouse resolution or campaign, stalin's gulag, killing fields. now it's actually a much more subtle form of repression that are used by these regimes and they are refashioning dictatorship for a modern age. so that's the main thrust. and every country traveled to come i always meet with two groups of people. i meet with people serving the regime come is serving a dictator, political advisors i.d. labs, karami's and also his meeting with people trying to offend appeared at his meeting with the stu
of the hour. his small business was destroyed by a violent mob of union protestors. now he is getting some help bouncing back. our coverage of the school tragedy in connecticut. next everyone is asking why this happened. is it the product of a changing culture? school counselor and psycho therapist joins us up next. [ male announcer ] this is steve. he loves risk. but whether he's climbing everest, scuba diving the great barrier reef with sharks, or jumping into the marke he goes with people he trusts, which is why he trades with a company that doesn't nickel and dime him with hidden fees. so he can worry about other things, like what the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. [ engine revs ] ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] the mercedes-benz winter event is back, with the perfect vehicle that's just right for you, no matter which list you're on. [ santa ] ho, ho, ho, ho! [ male announcer ] lease a 2013 c250 for $349 a month at your local mercedes-benz dealer. this bible changed the world. i'm kirk cameron.
into law making michigan the nation's 24th right it work state. now despite violent pro-union protests all day, governor snyder last night said these new laws will create more jobs. >> i don't view this as anti-union at all. i believe this is pro-worker. this is an opportunity for unions to step up to say how they can provide the best value to workers in our state and be really responsive and listen to them and hopefully get successful getting workers on board. jenna: many strong opinions about this. mike tobin in lansing, michigan with the latest. mike? >> reporter: a lot of sound, fury and big numbers are gone from the demonstrationsgan. if you look behind me the afl-cio with a silent protests. you see tape across their mouth. $1500 less that's what they believe on average workers will make here in michigan now that it has become a right-to-work state. this is sharp contrast what we saw yesterday, hundreds and hundreds of angry demonstrators on the capitol ground and capitol building itself. the democrats say this does in the mean the fight is over. a spokesman for the democratic party s
, the provision of the things that in other industrialized democracies, the model in which you have a union bargaining with a big capitalist firm and you come to this internal social contract for the employees. right? we work for you and get things like health care and retirement and security and other things. now this relationship of employment is coming tomorrow a start. one of the things that you can do is go to the model that it is a provision of the state and that would lessen the blow to the content jent workers. >> and that would be an outgrowth that the model has been so incredibly profitable. it's resulted in gains for investors and for companies. there's a lot of money on the table to be used to create the kind of dynamic social safety net. the problem is we've sort of let it stay off the table in term of revenue and we can afford to provide the sort of optimal sort of career labor exchange through the government. >> that's right. and to your point, you've used the word flexible. let's take a look at who this flexibility works for. it works well for the employers, for the companie
with more. i would think it would be a hot commodity. >> reporter: here is the interesting thing. union intransigence helped kill the twinkie and the paragon of junk food may be brought back to life by one of the most hated union foes of all, walmart. reports are walmart is looking at the body parts of the neb did hostess brand. 40 percent of hostess we sales. turnkeys, hellos, ding-dongs, and of the delights. here is how delicious it might be. closing doors after mark -- last month. needed to reduce $100 million per year in retiree health costs. over half of it going to people who never worked at hostess. forcing the company to run to separate fleets, now they're looking at buying a pieces. mostly brands without the union plans and some 18,000 workers, most union employees. now comes walmart, object of union's corn for years. protesters descended on stores to pick over workers having to serve shoppers on thanksgiving night, never mind that more union people than actual walmart employees are protesting. never mind the unions don't represent walmart workers, but they would love to. think
with civil unions and just went through my own process along with close friends of mine, one of whom has been in a 30-year relationship. is married. a friend of mine who has been a friend for more than 14 years. and the resolution really giev me the opportunity to focus on the issue and think about it. and there is a difference that is meaningful between civil unions and marriage. and that's why i made the decision that i did. but i'm not new to supporting lbgt rights and interest. >> city council alex vaughan sent me a personal statement. he is the city councilman who passed the resolution. he said, both the city council and mayor take a bold statement on this issue. as an african-american man and a political leader with a bright future in the democratic party, sir, can you explain how you were able to evolve on this issue, and how you think your evolvement will help a state like georgia? >> well, i think it's listening to the people that i know and care about. that's how a genuine change occurs. i happen to have a friend of mine, a woman named lee schrader who i have known since practicing
't dampening the spirits at the union square ice rink in san francisco. skaters were out in force despite the gray skies and occasional downpours. >> it's the best way to get in the holiday spirit for christmas. got any gingerbread latte. ice skating in union square, under the tree, it's the best. >> the union square ice rink will be open through the holidays. >>> for the latest on power outage, storm damage, and weather updates all day and all night, you go our website, nbcbayarea.com. >>> the quiet community is still reabouting to this news that a resident was killed in his home this week. this is the first homicide in that community in decades. nbc bay ear's kimberly terry is there for us. >> reporter: diana, police here continue their investigation, friends and family of that victim are warping the loss of their loved one who they identified. well-known millionaire, former owner of the famed winery. killed in his home yesterday. friends around neighbors say they're shocked and saddened by the news. it's first homicide in 40 years in the upscale neighborhood. the police say they got a
with the confederate army. on the union's side, not a blood relative but a man who had a formative influence on her life joined the union army and was involved with some notable battles. on the first lady's father's side, there is an ancestor. sometimes making these connections is difficult. someone who i think is an ancestor who joined the union army around the time slavery was ended. kind of making that link was unclear but not an easy thing. the records are there in terms of the civil war service of those ancestors and the descendants didn't know about that. >> you talk a lot about dna testing. with a book like this and your research have been possible before dna testing? >> good question. it certainly helped. we would have had circumstantial evidence that would have suggested the first lady's white ancestors came from the shield's family that owned millvinia but there would be no way to know for sure. 20 first century technology is what helped unravel -- ten years ago i wouldn't have been able to write this book in the way that it is now. >> any more questions? we have a little time left. i jus
with the cops union. civilian cops in the middle of a heated debate and it's next this holiday, share everything. share "not even close." s share "you owe me..." share "just right." the share everything plan. shareable data across 10 devices with unlimited talk and text. hurry in for a droid razr m by motorola for $49.99. >> shepard: civilians taking police work from the police. and it's making union workers very unhappy. the denver police chief says the department will hire about 45 regular folks for duties that officers handle right now. he says the goal is to put those cops back on patrol and save the city some 600,000 bucks. but the president of the police union there argues many of the jobs require law enforcement experience. he says it helps knowing how people commit crimes and that folks simply can't learn that from a book. our denver based correspondent there. what kind of jobs are we talking about? not out doing crime work, are they? >> right. these are positions that don't require a badge and a gun, according to police chief robert white here in denver. jobs that are more clerical, fin
the soviet union. so states like mississippi, states like georgia and texas and florida and southern california, arizona, north carolina are all being transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift in population and political influence. just think about it. really does three from 1964 to two dozen eight could be thought of as kind of the carried of sun belt dominance in american presidential history. if you think about every president elected from 1964-2008 comes from a state of the sun belt. lyndon johnson from texas, richard nixon from california, gerald ford was never elected. he was not even elected vice president. he was a michigan. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. first george bush, texas by a connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas, and the second bush from texas. so 2008 is in some ways a watershed election. it is this 40 year period of sun belt dominance. and there were issues that are critical in the politics that develop, that came out of the sun belt. they tended to have a conservative task to them. they tended to be oriented a
to the fiscal cliff and what it could mean for federal employees. unions are pushing hard to preserve federal jobs in the fiscal cliff deal. more about that would jacqueline simon. later, you thought the election of 2012 was over. not yet. the electoral college is meeting at noon today to make another step forward in the process of getting the president into his second term. we will hear more from the american university professor james thurber. we will leave you with more comments from president obama last night in newtown, connecticut, at the interfaith prayer vigil. [video clip] >> we gather here in memory of 20 beautiful children and six remarkable adults. they lost their lives in a school that could of been any school, in a quiet town full of good and decent people. it could be any town in america. here in newtown, i have come to offer the love and prayers of the nation. i am very mindful that mere words cannot match the depth of your sorrow, nor can they heal your wounded hearts. i can only hope it helps for you to know that you are not alone in your grief, that our world too has been t
the demise of the twinky and labor unions are threatening the big mac, fast food workers and what it means for your lunch. ♪ can't leave the table till you finish your vegetables. [ clock ticking ] [ male announcer ] there's a better way... v8 v-fusion. vegetable nutrition they need, fruit taste they love. could've had a v8. or...try kids boxes! ♪ ooh baby, can i do for you today? ♪ [ female announcer ] need help keeping your digestive balance? align can help. nly align has bifantis, a patented probiotic that naturally helps maintain your digestive balance. try align to help retain a balanced digestive system. try the #1 gastroenterologist recommended probiotic. align. bp has paid overthe people of bp twenty-threeitment to the gulf. billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. d bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never
, in the course of just seven days, what has happened in michigan is a blow to crush unions, crush collective bargaining, and to crush the power of individual workers to stand together, pool their resources, so that they can support public policy workers, in other words, politicians, so that they could support those politicians who support their interests. it's been working that way for almost 75 years, during that time we went from a nation where so many people were in poverty, lived in poverty, had no benefits, made slave wages, worked 20 hours a day. went from that kind of situation into where most workers were -- had attained middle class status, where workers could afford to go out, buy the house, buy the two cars, send the kids to college and take a vacation. and have nice clothes and all of the things that middle class people want. that's what the union movement produced for america by leveling -- by being in a strong position to be able to demand fairness and equity from the employer. so the employers, let's say general motors, ford, chrysler, the automobile manufacturers, since we're
for insured depository institution and the ncua for credit unions provides unlimited insurance for noninterest-bearing accounts at banks and credit unions. these transaction accounts are used by businesses, local governments, hospitals, and other nonprofit organizations for payroll and other recurrent expenses. and this program provides certainty to businesses in uncertain times. these accounts are also important to our nation's smallest financial institutions. in fact, 90% of community banks with assets under $10 billion have tag deposits. this program allows these institutions to serve the banking needs of the small businesses in their communities, keeping deposits local. in my state of south dakota, i know that the tag program is important to banks, credit unions, and small businesses. our nation's economy is certainly in a different place than it was in 2008 at the height of the financial crisis when this program was created. but with concerns about the fiscal cliff and continued instability in european markets, i believe a temporary extension is needed. therefore, i believe a clean two-ye
heavily unionized moved to right to work and i wouldn't be surprised if next year we see a couple more states fall. >> interesting contrast in maryland and virginia, neighboring states. you have in virginia, a republican governor cutting taxes, cutting spending. in maryland, you have a liberal democratic governor who's raised tacks all kinds of taxes, income taxes, gas taxes sales taxes, you name it. as a result virginia has a job growth rate that is three times that of maryland. virginia has a lower unemployment rate. so you see that contrast and paul, i think in this election, it actually worked to the president's benefit in some of the swing states like o-ohio and virginia and you had the voters in the states experiencing above average growth thanks to the policies of republican governors. >> paul: kim, then you see the alternatives and let me mention one state where democrat gina amando the state treasurer pushed through a terrific pension reform, probably the best in the country, but if you look at other states where the democratic coalition is dominant, illinois, for example, new
midwestern states that are traditionally m heavy unionized moved to the right to work. i wouldn't be surprised if we see a couple more states fall. >> interesting i contrast in maryland and virginia. in virginian you have republican governor cutting taxes and cutting spending. you have a liberal governor who has raised income taxes, gas taxes and as a result virginia has a job growth rate that is three times that of maryland. virginia hasra a lower unemployment rate. you can see that contrast, and i think in this election it actually worked the present benefit in some of these swing states like ohio and virginia where you had voters in those states experiencing above average economic growth y thanks to the policies of the republican governors. >> then you see the alternatives. let me talk about the one state really pushed through a terrific pension reform, probably the best in the country. but if you loo tk at other states where the democratic coalition is dominant, illinois for example, new york state and california you can see a very different policy mix. which direction are t
than just roofless capitalism strong labor unions of course tax rates of the top and then a second era of financial capitalism, deregulation and capitalism and there's a widespread belief to talk to people. it explores the growth and the higher efficiency that must make everybody better off and it's not true. growth was slower in the second half and because the big instance stopped being spread to the general population or went to a handful of people at the top. the archetype is that they are actually setting it too low. it's not the 1 percent, it is the .1% for people that needed and in the earlier period, paul was absolutely right in the earlier period the quintile, every group in the population was growing but the bottom part was growing faster than the top. today it is not that way. gdp doesn't really give you a good measure of what is happening through the economy and the society. so, while that one-tenth of 1 percent has been doing very well, the median income is lower than it was a decade and a half ago. it is as low as it was two decades ago to go to the top. so, it's clear tha
for american utilities. and that's why i'm naming it my new favorite railroad. even over and above union pacific, which is always been my favorite. don't get mad at me, union pacific. i used a great union pacific calendar, but it's december. that one's off the wall. anyway -- kansas city southern also saw some exposure to the bakken shale. they found so much oil, they need to ship it via train in order to get a decent price because there's not enough pipe yet, not enough pipe laid from north dakota to the rest of the country. and the company owns half of the panama canal railway which provides ocean to ocean service along the canal. they have fantastic management. david starling was named railroader of the year for 2012. this stock is taking you for a fabulous ride. i got the idea from brian ashenberg who writes the letter for the street.com. he gave us a lot at a really low price, a lot of good ideas. brian first got buying kansas city southern a while ago. the stock's given his news letter 360% return, but the stock's only up 14% in the last 12 months. i think many of the earnings esti
teaching her children. >> gretchen: the american federation of teacher's union is proposing a bar exam to weed out bad apples. will it work or just tryingo cover up other stuff. a elderly teacher resigned from the union years ago in florida. good morning. >> gretchen: why did you resign from the union? >> i left the union because i saw no purpose in belonging to it and i was broke, i was a teacher and i needed money. >> steve: and you live in florida, you don't have to belong to the union. >> exactly. >> steve: what do you make of the proposal by the american federation of teachers. they will have a high standard like a bar exam for teachers because it is hard to be a lawyer and hard to become a teacher, right? >> right. [laughing] i don't buy it. every state already has in place certification tests that people take. i believe that their intention to make the standards more rigorous. i fully support and i think you node the best of the best teaching the students. but at the same time. you continue to demand higher and higher quality and somebody has to pay for it. >> gretchen: don't yo
for the unions so i found it interesting that the administration is looking out for the union and not looking out for the state and individual citizens to bearey the load of this. lou: your ground operation would have been a little stronger. you could have prevented people of laws.sorts you don't find that as fair and equitable, right? >> we challenged on constitutional grounds, w but dd not quite get it all. lou: more lawsuits to come and we will see how those, as well. the great state of south carolina. great fobeing with us. hsbc agrees to being a mexican drug cartel bank. terrorists.ertern tonight she meets the former employee wriried to stop hsbc illegal conduct, former hsbc vice president with us tonight for an exclusive interview. progressive claims. this is flo. i need you. i feel so alone. but you're not alone. i knew you'd come. like i could stay away. you know i can't do this without you. you'll never have to. you're always there for me. shh! i'll get you a rental car. i could also use an umbrella. lou: hsbc facing more legal problems tonight. it was a blower who worked as a former vic
a book, a new approach to industrial economics where they have no unions. everybody is responsible for their own work. they do peace work. everybody's responsible. everybody has a lifetime job. they get huge pieces of the pie. and ownership is -- the people, the workers, everybody owns the piece of the pie. host: what does this have to do with the fiscal cliff? caller: well, if more -- if more people -- if more industries would go to that, they wouldn't fall off the cliff. everybody would go to work. host: mr. rosenberg? guest: so i haven't heard of that but it sounds like a great place to be and live. i would have to get the name of that again. host: next up is don on the washington redskins. -- "washington journal." caller: i've been on social security for several years now. it's my understanding that the amount of money that you pay in through the payroll tax affects the amount of social security that you receive and it looks to me like people are under the illusion that this 2% is a good deal but at the same time, why they're going to be shortening themselves when they retire.
in august but an union representing freelance technical employees picketed at a game in los angeles. they wanted to establish standard wages and benefits for freelancers working live sporting events. they had fewer cameras because of the walkout. the pac 12 network said it is focused on an unclues sieve environment. >>> looking to grab a big win today. it gets tougher with tom brady and the new england patriots on the schedule for next sun apsunday night. they will keep an eye on collin kaepernak and they will take them on at 1:05 and if mario can't place because after bad shoulder. >> following "mornings on 2" this morning, it is fox nfl sunday and then cincinnati against the ben gallons. >>> bring a toy with you. volunteers will be at candlestick park collecting unwrapped toys. it is all part of the operation dream toy drive. they will be donateed to thousands of children who live in san francisco public housing. >>> mysterious light in the sky over texas. now a debate over what caused it. >> if you are looking to hit the slopes. things are looking good. we will tell you about the
, which i won't refer to as right to work legislation, it's more appropriately named crush the union legislation. i came up last night to the floor to speak on that issue, and as i am prone to do, i use a lot of analogies. so last night i used an analogy that some find offensive, and i certainly was not meaning to be offensive or use a derogatory term. you know, everybody knows what the n word is. . the n word, mr. speaker, is used to describe a group of people and the n word used to be fashionable or it used to be socially acceptable to use the n word, but now we don't say the n word, we say -- we refer to that word as the n word. i had never heard of the m word, representative schakowsky, the m word. it's a word also that describes a group of people and it at one time has been commonly used as a desipive -- descripive term. it was at one time socially -- scripive term. it was at one time socially acceptable. but to my discovery, just within the last 12 hours or so, i have found that the use of the -- the use of the m word is no longer socially acceptable. now, the m word he refers
's decision to invade the soviet union. august 1945, president truman's decision to use an atomic bomb against japan. tonight, we'll examine the process of making a tough decisi decision. we'll hear about major decisions on an international stage, about corporate decisions and personal ones. from taking down the most wanted man in the world -- >> the president turned to us and said i made my decision. we're going to go with a raid. write up the orders. >> to giving up a dream career. >> it was this sense of almost unreality, of just i'm not sure i know who i am. >> to uprooting a company culture. >> some people actually quit. >> to opening the door to a closed society. this is like a spy thriller. >> absolutely. >> each of my guests has wrestled with a difficult choice. they will take us through their deliberations, their fears, and how they made their tough decisions. >>> at 11:00 p.m. on may 1st, 2011, two black hawk helicopters, 23 navy s.e.a.l.s, a translator and a dog named cairo took off from jalalabad, afghanistan. the mission, to kill the world's most wanted man, osama bin laden. >> de
don't like how guns are more and more acceptable in public places. >> when you're in union station and you come down the escalator and there's a few police there with guns slung over and -- i hate that. >> gun store owners say the protest probably won't make a difference. in fact, the stores have seen an increase in sales because many fear stricter regulations in light of the newtown school shooting. >>> all right. let's go to melissa mollet with breaking news at the live desk. >> brand new surveillance video we got from new york police. this is just into the newsroom. take a look. video of the woman police say pushed a man to his death in front of a subway train in new york thursday night. it is a bit hard to sigh. but it shows the woman running from the platform in queens. witnesses say she had been following the man closely and mumbling to herself and then shoved him as the train pulled into the platform. the second time this month, someone has been shoved to their death on subway tracks. she's described as heavy-set and in her 20s. at the live desk, melissa mollet, news 4. >>>
these states are smaller states, more rural states. states in which public employee unions have less leverage in the politics which makes a big difference. and i think where the infrastructure needs are nowhere near as great as they are in the states that have central cities which require massive public transportation. mechanisms. the fact that those analogies aren't there doesn't diminish in any way the quite prudent and proper steps that these states have taken to keep their own fiscal house in order. certainly having rainy day funds which many of the big northern states haven't had is absolutely critical to take care of the enormous variations that occur in budgets, in the economy. i think you can't lose sight of the fact that one of the reasons you have smaller medicaid expenditure is because of the federal formula. which favors some states because it isn't based on the actual need. it's based on a median income calculation. and as a result of that, a state like new york or california has a lot more poor people. and it also has a lot of rich people. it doesn't get the same break. i think
people to join unions and economies move and want to be a part of what is happening. when you get more parents choices of education, it tells all children, low-income children, we see it all over the country. we can prove it with research prepare. when states have the right for their own energy, the revenues that come into the government help build better roads, better schools, and keep taxes lower. that is an opportunity i hope we can have in south carolina. this could be more efficient and do much better than we can do under the federal area. the principles of freedom are working. we need to spot like them, a showcase them, communicate them so people see that these ideas work. at the same time, they're going to be able to look to washington and see that the ideas that emplace are dragging us down. when washington hits a wall, the friends of freedom in south carolina and all over the country are going to be ready not with political ideas of american ideas, ideas we now are working that we can show they're working for 100% of americans. that is what i am going to be doing for the next
motivating factors are my core values learned within the catholic church and unions and actually reading the constitution, they are very similar. and i find myself looking at them -- looking at our representatives regarding their voting records and actions in regard to, say, equity in education and access to health care and fiar pay. and i actually have to say i link the fairness and focus on just this in regard to domestic issues and international issues. i do not apply those values just to u.s. citizens but to apply the same desires for fairness and justice with regard to our foreign policy, u.s. foreign- policy. i do find that my religious upbringing does -- is interwoven in however prison as. host: rich from tennessee. independent caller. caller: merry christmas, greta. host: good morning, merry christmas. caller: i echo the last caller. i would say my politics changed from republican to it independent. i voted the constitution party the last presidential election. but i found that most people who are serious voters do consider moral beliefs, our laws are based on morality. whether t
firsthand what it was like to live under the domination of the soviet union. they understand the significance of this particular proposal and these particular dinds of -- kinds of bills. i would like at this time to recognize the retiring chairman of the rules committee who has done -- soon-to-be retiring chairman of the rules committee who has done so much in his tenure here, i would like to recognize him for 15 seconds, if he goes over that he may have as much time as he wishes to consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california is recognized for 15 seconds. mr. dreier: i thank my friend for the 15 seconds, and i'll try not to exceed that. if i do i appreciate his generosity in yielding me such time as i might consume. mr. speaker, let me just say that i appreciate the fact that my friend said we should have a defense capability that is second to none. we should be pre-eminent in the world. i appreciate his statement that that needs to be done. i also appreciate the fact that he talks about the multifairous societal needs out there, ensuring we don't see thos
ago apa lisa jackson is stepping down after the president's state of the union speech in january. jackson starting with the agency as a staff level scientist back in 1987. during her tenure as administrator she tackled pollution problems in poor community communities. oil drilling and coal regulations. all those things on her plate. jackson said she is confident epa is headed in the right direction. >>> winter storm causing some real headaches. millions of folks in the mid-atlantic states, we're looking at heavy snow, torrential rain, strong winds, dangerous travel conditions from here, washington, d.c., all the way to maine. snowfall is especially heavy in northern new york, new england. up to a foot of snow could fall there. drew cuomo is urging folks to stay off the road if possible. it is wet, lever, raising the risk of falling tree limbs, making shoveling the sidewalk harder, we all know that. the storm is not expected to leave the region until tomorrow. not soon enough for millions of people trying to catch a plane for the holiday week, but they can't. more than 360 flights
bill to try to help us get rid of the soviet union as an enemy. even if you discount that, federal spending skyrocketed under the reagan administration. we can improve the education of kids in georgia and across this country by getting rid of the department of education, letting those dollars stay in the hands of our government there in georgia. improve the education of our kids but it is not by building a bigger department of education. i have been very critical of the bush administration as well as this administration. i am trying to find solutions to the problems so your kids and all the kids in this nation can have a great education. leader.ave thbe the world's i am trying to find some common sense solutions to these problems. host: david is on the phone on a line for democrats. good morning. caller: good morning. i would like to say rest in peace for those in sandy hook. i think there is too much time spent focusing on the problems and not on the solutions. i think if they had a gun buyback program or they are given incentives -- where they are given incentives. either way, yo
liberties union. chris, good afternoon to you. first of all, let me get your response to that new study commissioned by california senator dianne feinstein. >> well, it confirms what we have known for a long time, which is that there is enough space, there is enough facilities in the united states to bring people from guantanamo here to be tried before regular federal criminal courts, courts that have had over 400 convictions of people tried and convicted for terrorism-related offenses. big-time -- big-time terrorism defendants who are convicted and are serving serious times. those people can be held securely here after trial, if they're convicted. and there is plenty of room for them in the federal criminal system. and that gao study confirmed that. >> is the opposition to this point, is the opposition primarily because such a move would be unprecedented? >> well, i think this whole opposition seems to have gotten out of control. i think senator rand paul did a very -- a republican, a tea party republican did a very good job of responding to that crazy bastards comment. because what he
the soviet union. i asked my teenage daughter, she says you know, what's wrong with russia? russia was the soviet union and she said what's that? it's a big thing in the late 80s and early '90s before it toppled. we were geared up to fight them and most of us have never really considered iraq or knew who saddam hussein was. after that war was over, which winning was a forgone conclusion, you you no? the terrorism thing caught us by surprise. we thought they were rabble-rousers and never gave them too much credit. interesting enough all the buildings in khobar were told by the bin laden construction company and they had the bin laden stamps on all of the buildings. how is that for irony? but after that things kind of changed and the world trade center bombings and september 11 of course, we all know what happened that day. i was actually flying that morning and had come back from the middle east from another
are my!Ññ?ñ rights. i have no rights. once i started complaining to the union that iv ?ñ had not been represented, you know, or given a police report then i st÷i]y having problems with the administration and i hadn't had problems before. so basically i just want justice. i have -- i'm couple of years before i# and here i am fighting dismissal, and being told that i>yñ?ñ? don't do my job. i informed the principal that i didn't want to go into the counseling office because it was a volatile situation. i went in phone thrown at my head. and they're denying all of this. but it's in writing. there was a letter issued to the parents saying that all of these allegations were untrue. but it's allc?ñ?ñ? documentated. >> thank you, mr. caine. >> good evening, everyone. my name's linda cooks. i was teacher at martin luther king school. walked in to take my grades and i've come before the board before. and i tried to figure out what i walked in to take my grades and theéñ?ñ? student who was -- by the principal approac
. look for low mid-60s in the east bay inland. and a 64 degrees in san leandro, union city, and also 60s for the north bay. 60s at the beaches and 60s on the peninsula. your kron 4 7 day around the bay tuesday, will start off with sunshine and the owls will b heavier clouds--flicker. and to showers lasting through the day with heavy clouds. however, clearing for the thursday afternoon and because this is coming in from the gulf of alaska, cold air toward even low mid '50s on the midweek or and the last chance will be on the saturday. >> the woman who was born she was born in 1896 and had lived during three different centuries but there was so much more to her life. george howell went and found one person that knew her best to learn more about her extraordinary life. she saw the turn of the century twice.living 116 years. the world's oldest person. her 77 year-old son tells her story best. "she was a very determined person. and she thought, if she wanted to do it, she could do it. she did most of the time." "well into her hundreds." "oh yeah, well into her hundreds. and she lived at home
-that the bombs what is on site. the union high school district is actually the school district that contacted mocked the vistmonte vista . >> continue as always also said to be shut down but they have not been affected. so far it is monte vista on mcclellan road. we have road leading to a high school block in all directions attention to keep everyone far back. so this is that the ignittechnician can go in and check the bomb. >> officials will let parents know when schools will be open. it is right now shut down. there is no one on campus. felipolice in cupertino are keeping people well that while they conduct their search. >> at this point a threat has been made in graffiti on the monte vista terrace is regarding student at the monte vista high school. >> we have heard no indication that this is legitimate but they are going to the process of clearing the campus room by room. we will let you know we did more informations. >> here traffic center with robins a major hot spots. and early one fatal accident on san mateo bridge has cleared. problems of one the one in redwood city. >> right between
prendergast who is a union rank activists, best selling author and cofounder of the enough project. in addition to end genocide and crimes against humanity. has worked for the clinton administration, state department and in congress. is also worked with the national intelligence council, human rights watch, international crisis group and the u.s. institute of peace. he has helped fund schools in darfur in refugee camps, now belongs to a satellite project with george clooney. mr. prendergast has worked for peace in africa for well over a quarter of a century. then we will hear from mvemba dizolele, who is a visiting fellow at stanford university's hoover institution, and professor, lecture and african studies at johns hopkins university school of advanced international studies. mr. dizolele has testified several times before the congress. his work has appeared frequently in many major news publications, and he is a frequent commentator on african affairs on television and radio. he served as election monitor in the drc in 2006, and again in 2011. and has also been indicted with unit
that the teachers overcharged us and that the unions break the bank of the state? they should think about what a teacher has to go through. the kid's mother, the news lately was saying that she was some kind of survivalist, thinking the economist -- that the economy would crash. she has a mentally disturbed son with guns in the house? what she thinking about? she obviously has a problem along with her son. someone should have come to earth, saying that we know where you are thinking about. look at the results. host: you live in new york city. what you think about mayor bloomberg and his opinion on the gun issue? caller code generally what mort zuckerman was talking about -- caller code generally put more zuckerman was talking about, how many times has he been caught at -- stopped and frisked on the street on his way to an important meeting? now they want to go through his pockets? he thinks that stop and frisk is ok? i will take my chances with the people in my community rather than a police organization pulling me over and the time they feel like it. host of this, and comes to us from faceboo
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